Forgetting – Humanity’s greatest gift

philosophy tag

By Jeng Yang

We’ve frequently extolled the virtues of remembering. We hail those with perfect memory as heroes. Hell, we even have World Memory Championships. Sometimes we don’t remember the fact that memories are dangerous things.

You’ve probably asked people how their thought processes work. Mine works pretty badly; I reached today’s topic by thinking about how I or anyone else would or could move on from the death of a loved one. I decided to think about the gift of forgetting.

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Identity of Indiscernable

philosophy tag

by Koxeida

Living out his imagination, thinking the worth of his life, and communicating his identity through writing, Koxeida struggles not for the sake of others, but for himself. He is a selfish amateur being.

Just some food for thought when I was thinking about the issue of cloning, and it reminded me of Leibniz’s theory on indiscernible.

Is it possible that there can be exactly 2 identical objects?

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Thinking Way Too Much: How Sleeping 3 Times A Day Led Me To Freedom

philosophy tag

by Jeng Yang

This is a new series where I explore posts that have unconventional or complex conclusions drawn from comparatively simpler life situations. Arguably, this is the entire premise of philosophy, but still.

I used to be like one of you uni-cyclical sleepers (People who sleep once a day)(I made that term up. It’s mine.) until I adopted the complex philosophy of ‘Screw it, I’m tired and going to bed, I don’t care what time it is’. This has resulted in me taking a series of short naps; waking up and sleeping at various times of the day. Common conversation topics with my hallmates include ‘Why the hell are you sleeping at 3pm?’ and ‘Why the hell have you just woken up at 12am?’.

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The Responsibility of Love

philosophy tag

by Anonymous

You want someone who’s independent and strong. Someone who knows where she’s going yet lost to just the right extent that it’s exciting. You want someone who does not need you to live. Her life would have been just as colorful, vivid and fulfilling if you had never entered it. You find that quality intoxicatingly attractive.

Maybe it is because your mother is just as headstrong and driven. Perhaps it is because it relieves you of the burden of making her happy. Maybe you simply like the thrill and challenge of capturing the heart of a woman who never felt a need to rest her heart in another’s hands. You see it as the ultimate test of your allure, the biggest compliment to your desirability, the grandest stroke to your ego.

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The pursuit of ignorance

philosophy tag

By Chia Jeng Yang

Is the pursuit of ignorance a legitimate philosophy? I assume I’m speaking to either dissidents of this theory or hypocrites. I would prefer to have been ignorant about the nihilistic nature of life. I would prefer to have been ignorant about many things. I would have the highest quality of happiness I would have known.

In Alain De Botton’s book, The Social Status, he talks about how the presence of greater wealth and information have directly lead to a greater level of unhappiness. When we know what others have, and what we can have, we find ourselves yearning, he argues very convincingly. Surely then, happiness can lie somewhere in the lines of a more spartan and remote life.

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An understanding of good work

Everest Base Camp trek - The understanding of good work

By Chia Jeng Yang

If you are like me, you have been caught in the gulf of understanding that exist in the schooling years before working life. I find myself in a stage of definition.

I struggle to define identity, philosophy and life. This blog hopes to be a platform for all of us, the casual blogger, to share their detailed thoughts on any subjects that we find most intriguing. And food, because food. Together, as amateur beings, as we stumble haltingly, let us lift torches of insights from wherever we may be.

The first story I would like to share is about the concept of good work.

We go to exams or work and if we work hard enough, we win praise, awards and commendations. These are intangible trinkets that draw their power from the established social structure. We are happy to receive these intangibles simply because society dictates that we should be. One day, I realized this was not sustainable. It did not fulfill me. It was work, successful and respectable work even, but not good work. Fatigued by a short lifetime of chasing for intangible reward, we forget the purity of physical suffering.

What? Physical suffering? That’s some weird shit.

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